According to a recent editorial published by the Journal of the College of Optometrists, the future of myopia control has already arrived. From the intro paragraph of a surprisingly readable medical journal editorial, the author states that, for myopia control, “the tide has now turned. A number of treatments have been shown to cut progression rates in half and motivated clinician could expand his or her practice to incorporate myopia control”.

The piece first surveys the research and results from some of the more modest successes with spectacle lens correction, citing studies from China in particular. The author then focuses on the three most recent and promising advances in myopia control – night-time contact lenses (other K), soft multi-focal daytime lenses and atropine.

We proudly note these three protocols are the primary treatment methods we offer our young patients here at Treehouse Eyes. The editorial is worth a full read, and we recommend parents of children with myopia read and share with other families with nearsighted kids.

In summary, the author notes that, “optical therapies will be refined, particularly for contact lenses, and additional clinical trials will enhance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Given the effectiveness of atropine, commercial development of designer myopia drugs has likely stalled, although a sustained release device would be an attractive alternative to daily drug installation.  Finally, the mechanism underlying the benefits of outdoor activity remain unclear with Vitamin D, light levels and spectral composition all potentially playing a role.”

We couldn’t agree more with his insights, as well as his passionate call-to-action for all optometrists to begin practicing actual myopia control. The kind of revolutionary myopia control techniques which are the treatments we offer at Treehouse Eyes, today.

You can find the full editorial here — to make an appointment for your child’s assessment at Treehouse Eyes, please visit our page here.